Karwa Chauth, An Absolute and Unbreakable Bond

Karwa Chauth is celebrated on the fourth day (Chauth) from the full moon day in the month of Kartik as per the Hindu calendar. This year it fall on 26th October 2010 [More...] This day is symbolic of the strong bond between married couples. Though this festival is predominantly celebrated in North and North-Western parts of India it has spread in other regions of the country as well.

 

Simran is fasting all day and she wishes that only Raj, one whom she loves, will make her drink the first drop of water and give her the first morsel of food! Are you wondering what is it all about?

Then well, this is about Karwa Chauth celebrated lavishly in our very own Bollywood Movies. And the above characters comprise the romantic couple of the movie “Dil Wale Dulhaniya Lejaenge”

The importance that Bollywood has been giving to this festival talks about its popularity among the masses, about its traditional roots and most importantly about the sacredness of the relation it signifies-Marriage.

Karwa Chauth is celebrated on the fourth day (Chauth) from the full moon day in the month of Kartik as per the Hindu calendar. This year it fall on 26th October 2010 This day is symbolic of the strong bond between married couples. Though this festival is predominantly celebrated in North and North-Western parts of India it has spread in other regions of the country as well.

Rituals For The Day

Karwa Chauth, An Absolute and Unbreakable BondAs per the tradition, married Hindu women fast whole day for the long life and well being of their husbands. All the women of the family wake up early in the morning and eat Sargi before dawn. Sargi is special food prepared and sent by the mother-in-law. And thereby begins their fast. Women have neither food nor water until they see the moon.

Inspite of the day long strict fast, in evening women get dressed in traditional lehangas or sarees, adorn themselves with jewelry, mehendi and make up and prepare their Pooja Thali. Karwa Chauth story is narrated by elderly women and they all wait patiently for moonrise.

Moon rise thus becomes the most waited moment of the day and the most celebrated as well. Once they see the moon, it is time for the Pooja. Women worship the moon and their husbands, and then look at the moon first though a sieve, close their eyes, and look at their husbands though the same sieve. (This part of the ritual is followed mostly by the North Indians and not as much by the other regions.)

This is followed by an Aarti. After which the women touch the feet of their husbands and take their blessings. It is now that the husbands break the fast of their respective wives by giving them first sip of water and first morsel of food.

Changing Times

As time changes so do rituals. Likewise increasing nuclear families have led to some changes in the traditional process of Karwa Chauth. Also in today’s world, with women working as much as men, it becomes challenging for them to fast along with the hectic work schedule. Some do it and some prefer an off on the day.

Some interesting additions

  • The first Karwa Chauth is a very special one for newly weds and they are given utmost importance by all family members.
  • Some husbands also fast with their wives to reciprocate love and care for them.
  • It has also become a trend among young girls to fast for their future husband as a gesture of their love.

Just like our Simran and Raj, who are not married as yet, but are both fasting nevertheless for each other!

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